Toilet Training Advice from Our Early Learning Educators

 In Child Care, Parenting, Parents, Uncategorised, You & your family
Home » Toilet Training Advice from Our Early Learning Educators

 

 

Becoming independent with toileting is a rewarding milestone in your child’s life, but it is not one that can be rushed. Children reach this stage in their own time and it is important to remain relaxed throughout the process.

Most children are ready to transition to independent toileting between 18 months and 3 years, but not always at the same pace. Some children will transition quickly while others may need some extra time.

Allowing this to happen naturally will ensure you get where you want to go with the least amount of angst.

 

Is it Right for You?

Some children will become naturally curious about toileting and may be ready for the potty before the age of 1!  Others may be reluctant and there are likely to be good reasons for this. Remember, all bodies function differently and your child’s toileting habits should not be influenced by external pressure.

Remember, all bodies function differently and your child’s toileting habits should not be influenced by external pressure.

Look for signs that your child is ready so you know when to start encouraging independence.

  • Are they becoming more independent with everyday tasks?
  • Are they showing an interest in the toilet, watching other family members use the toilet, or beginning to talk about it?
  • Are they showing signs of bladder and bowel control, lasting longer without needing a nappy change?
  • Do they resist wearing a nappy and prefer to wear underpants?

 

If you feel that your child is ready, begin by discussing this together. Families use a range of different words for toileting and you may just go with the words your child chooses. Setting clear communication tools and guidelines for your child will help make the transition a natural part of your day together.

Encourage your child to ask to use the toilet or potty when they feel the urge. Enjoy the ritual of washing hands together, perhaps with a special soap and hand towel to make the routine fun.

Once communication pathways are open, you can decide whether to use a potty or the toilet by talking to your child about how they feel. There are seats that can be placed on the toilet seat for children, making it smaller, more comfortable and less daunting.

If you decide to use the potty, it comes with some advantages, as it is mobile and it can be taken with you. The decision to stay with the potty or move to a toilet will depend on how your child feels about it.

Some children are afraid they will fall into the toilet or they find that the toilet feels far too big.

 

Toileting Independence Away from Home

One of the biggest obstacles to toilet training is navigating those times when you are away from home. Nappies can continue to be worn for convenience in the beginning but there will come a time where they need to be left behind.

If your child attends child care or daycare, this is an ideal opportunity to create continuity with home habits. Child care centres have child sized toilets so children can begin to use them with confidence and pride. The ritual around independent toileting is something child care educators are experienced with. Whether it’s at home or during care, it’s important to remember that accidents will happen and this is all perfectly normal.

Child care centres have child sized toilets so children can begin to use them with confidence and pride. The ritual around independent toileting is something child care educators are experienced with. Whether it’s at home or during care, it’s important to remember that accidents will happen and this is all perfectly normal.

Whether it’s at home or during care, it’s important to remember that accidents will happen and this is all perfectly normal.

If you would like to talk to an educator about toilet training or to enrol in Mindarie Keys Early Learning School, contact us today.

Enquire about our centre and enrolment program

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